05269

California 2022 COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave Poster

$16.95

California public and private sector employers with more than 25 employees are required to post the California 2022 COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave Poster in each workplace, from Feb. 19, 2022 through Dec. 31, 2022.

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Who must post the California 2022 COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave Poster?

Effective February 19, 2022 and continuing through December 31, 2022, California employers in the public and private sectors who employ more than 25 employees are required to display in a conspicuous location in each workplace of the employer the California 2022 COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave Poster. (LC § 248.6(d)). The law permits employers with covered, remote employees who do not frequent a workplace, to disseminate the notice to these employees by electronic means.

What does the California 2022 COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave Poster Cover?

The California 2022 COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave Poster informs covered employees of their right to take Supplemental Paid Sick Leave (SPSL) for reasons related to COVID-19. The 2022 SPSL was established pursuant to California Senate Bill 114 that was signed into law on February 9, 2022. Originally, the law was set to expire on September 30, 2022. However, in September, 2022, California’s Governor signed legislation (AB 152) extending SPSL to December 31, 2022.

How much SPSL? Under the law, covered full-time employees are entitled to up to 80 hours of SPSL for specified reasons, 40 hours of which can be used only if an employee or a family member tests positive for COVID-19. Part-time employees’ leave entitlement is determined by the number of hours the employee works in a two-week period.

Who is covered by SPSL? An employee is “covered” if the employee is unable to work or telework for an employer for any of the specified reasons. A “family member” for whom an employee may take leave includes a child, parent, spouse, registered domestic partner, grandparent, grandchild, or sibling.

What are the reasons for SPSL? An employee may use up to 40 hours of SPSL for the following reasons:

    1. The employee or a family member is attending a COVID-19 vaccination or booster shot appointment, or is experiencing symptoms from a COVID-19 vaccination or booster shot. An employer may limit this time to 24 hours or 3 days.
    2. The employee is subject to a quarantine or isolation period related to COVID-19 pursuant to order or guidance from the CDPH, CDC, or a local public health officer; has been advised by a healthcare provider to quarantine; or is experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and seeking a medical diagnosis.
    3. The employee is caring for a family member who is subject to a COVID-19 quarantine or isolation period; has been advised by a healthcare
      provider to quarantine due to COVID-19; or is caring for a child whose school or place of care is closed or unavailable due to COVID-19.

An employee may use up to 40 hours of additional SPSL if:

    1. The covered employee tests positive for COVID-19; or
    2. The covered employee is caring for a family member who tested positive for COVID-19.

What must covered employees be paid? The 2022 SPSL law is retroactive to January 1, 2022. Thus, if an employee took leave for one of the specified COVID-19-related reasons on or after that date, the employee must be compensated for those hours at the employee’s regular rate of pay. Employees who did not receive sufficient compensation may request a retroactive payment. The law limits employer payment obligations to $511 per day or $5,110 in total.

How are Employees Protected?

  • The law prohibits retaliation or discrimination against a covered employee for requesting or using 2022 COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick leave. Employees can use the contact information provided on the SPSL Poster to contact and file a complaint with the Labor Commissioner’s Office.
  • Employers are encouraged to review the legislation for complete information about their obligations under the law.
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